Welcome to the Lackawanna Trail Park

We hope you will find your visit with us to be a unique and memorable experience. We offer a pristine park like trail along the former railroad property.

Passenger train service is available to park visitors beginning at our South Columbia facilities.

Parking is available in the open area in front of the Newark Milk and Cream Company building. The passenger boarding area is across the street at the South Columbia train shed. Crew members will accompany you on your journey out to the “West End”.

Once you have taken the train to the end of track you may continue on foot ahead on the trail for about another two miles to “McKoon’s crossing”.

The round trip for the short ride is about 30 minutes. If you wish to venture on foot along the tracks where the train is running be sure to give way to the passing trains. Do not stand on bridge decks when a train is passing. When travelling on foot along the trail be sure to use adequate caution when traversing the trail. You may encounter slippery or potentially dangerous conditions so be sure to keep youngsters aware of the dangers out on the railroad!

Tickets are required to visit our park. We use the proceeds of your ticket sales to build our railway and enhance the experience of walking or riding along.

Beginning at the South Columbia train shed you may choose to ride to the end of the line and return- about a 30 minute ride. If you choose to venture on foot towards McKoon’s crossing be sure to keep an eye on the time so you can get the last train back to the station!

Exploration on foot heading south towards Richfield Springs is also available to our visitors. You will traverse a diverse, varied terrain sometimes high on a fill or low in a cut. Be sure to be respectful of our neighbor friends along the trail as we don’t want our use of the trail to be bothersome to them.

Look for artifacts along the trail that tell the story of a railroad built with pride over 150 years ago. You will see ties that were cast aside in the abandonment of the railroad in 1995. Screw spikes can be seen in many of them as the Lackawanna Railroad preferred them to the more common spikes we use on our own track construction today.